Optimize Facility Renovation, Repair, and Construction Delivery with Robust Business Processes

Optimize Facility Renovation, Repair, and Construction Delivery with Robust Business Processes

Real Property Owners, Contractors, Architects, and Engineers are under tremendous pressure to innovate, accelerate project delivery times, and minimize costs.   Also, all parties must implement methods to improve the customer experience of building users.
Many AEC organizations find these objectives difficult to achieve. They remain plagued by low productivity, a low-bid/change-order mentality, and adversarial relationships among all construction project participants.  As a result, building users are unsatisfied, facility management is treated as an expense versus an asset, and sub-optimal performance has become the norm.

Solutions to the above problems have existed for decades.  The are not, however, to be found in technology.   Performance improvements are available via LEAN business process and associated collaborative construction delivery methods.

The reason its hard for Owners, Facility Managers and AEC service providers to optimize operations is that collaboration,  team leadership, and asset life-cycle modeling/management are not areas of  core expertise.   They were generally not part of their formal education, nor their professional training.

Furthermore, the application of LEAN processes to Facility Management and AEC services requires  deep visibility into workflows, tasks, and detailed costs.   The latter is impossible without common terms, definitions, and data architectures, and reliance upon ad-hoc and inefficient manual processes that continuously “reinvent” the wheel, duplicate work, rely upon excessive management and control, and introduce variability.

When core facility life-cycle management processes, players, and systems are not fully integrated and on-board, and competency is not present in each required domain, any measurable improvement in outcomes is extremely challenging.

Integrated Project Delivery, IPD and Job Order Contracting, JOC are examples of efficient LEAN collaborative construction delivery methods than deliver on-time, on-budget, quality projects in excess of 90% of the time.   This level of performance remains unmatched by traditional design-bid-build, CM@R, or design-build. Both have been available for consistent implementation for decades.

Both IPD and JOC require an understanding of the challenges facing both Owners, AEC service providers, and building users.   Better education and awareness is the only viable path forward.    The good news is that both can be supported by technology to enable relatively low cost and consistent deployment.

In short the adoption of collaborative LEAN construction delivery processes and an asset life-cycle perspective lead the transformation from wasteful, unsatisfactory outcomes, to economically and environmentally improved results.

Ad-hoc practices are transformed into information-supported decision-marking that leverages multi-domain expertise and associated analytics,completely transparent, efficient and unified operations, and enhanced satisfaction for all stakeholders.

BIM asset life-cycle competencies

Collaborative Job Order Contracting Construction Delivery

job order contracting history

10 steps toward real property stewardship

OpenJOC Detailed Process Diagramjob order contracting



Asset Life-cycle Model, Asset Information Model, and Why BIM Won’t Work

The U.S. tried to foster BIM with NBIMS,  also others in the world tried PAS this and PAS that, and ISO this and ISO that… the issue remains that standards can’t replace knowledge and competency.

At the end of there day BIM represents nothing new relative to the efficient life-cycle management of the built environment.  Sure, software firms, and folks that love 3D and make a living from it will tell you otherwise, but the simple truth is that BIM, as we now know it, can not and will not survive.

The fact that BIM is a failure is sad because the world desperately needs to get a grip on how to manage its limited economic and environment resources and built structures are significant in that process.   Furthermore, there are critical life-safety and security issues associated with our crumbling and mismanaged physical infrastructure.

The primary issue is that many facility management and AEC professionals confused 3D visualization with asset life-cycle management.  While 3D visualization is nice tool, is is just that, an individual component in the toolbox.  It’s not even the most important tool.   Large, multi-site, multi-national real property portfolios can be efficiently managed WITHOUT 3D visualization and BIM software as now available.

Thus the pressure by countries, such as the UK to use BIM is misdirected.

Any government regulation should be directly solely at Owners.  More specifically, asset life-cycle management practices and collaborative construction delivery methods (integrated project delivery – IPD, job order contracting – JOC)  should be mandated.  This includes a formalized set up key performance indicators (KPIs), robust lean best management practices, and ongoing education and training.

The methods to eliminate the rampant environment and economic waste endemic to the Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Operations, and Owner sectors has been available for decades,  we simply don’t require Owners to do their jobs.

Owners must be required to develop technical and business competencies with respect to asset life-cycle modeling and total cost of ownership, and be able to LEAD collaborative teams of service providers.     Until this happens….   nothing will change, it is indeed as simple as that.

BIM asset life-cycle competencies

Asset Comptency Model

Asset Competency Model – The Road to Excellence

Asset Competency Model – The Road to Excellence

…at the end of the day the single issue of importance is whether or not Owners, Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Consultants, and Oversight Groups have the basic skills and/or competency required to efficiently manage the life-cycle of the built environment.

Accreditation, standards, business processes, certification… all are important, yet at the end of the day the single issue of importance is whether or not Owners, Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Consultants, and Oversight Groups have the basic skills and/or competency needed to efficiently manage the life-cycle of the built environment.

Before even addressing the obvious requirements for restructured education and professional training among all stakeholders, understanding the core business areas/processes and associated competencies is step #1.

strategic facility management and BIM

The primary business process areas involved in asset and/or facility management are:





The competencies,  that is to say the skills and activities performed within specified primary business areas, are:

  1. Programming

  2. Design

  3. Construction

  4. Operations

  5. Planned/preventive/emergency/general  maintenance

  6. Repairs

  7. Retrofits/Upgrades

  8. Improvements

  9. Replacements

  10. Space Planning

  11. Utilization

Asset LIfe-cycle Costs

Owners must demonstrate LEADERSHIP, in their role as steward of the built environment, and foster fundamental knowledge among their peers and all other parties involved.   Formal and professional education must be updated, as must the overall “culture” of the AEC and Facility Management industry, to provide visibility into proven, efficient methods for life-cycle management of the built environment.

As we have seen, technology is not the cause of the lack of productivity throughout the AEC sector, not is technology going to be the savior.  For example, the adoption of BIM for life-cycle management (its most significant value proposition), despite the trivia from marketers and poorly  designed research studies, has stagnated in the U.S.  and the U.K.    The reason for poor adoption is clear.   Requisite focus and competence relative to asset life-cycle management doesn’t exist.

While facility managers and associated organizations tout their prowess, the reality is that fewer than 5% of the AEC sector practices, or even understand the core requirements of efficient life-cycle management.  Nor do these individuals have the skills to communicate the needs and drive change management within their organizations.

Value Gap
It’s the role of Facility Management Executives to close the VALUE GAP.

We all know that in today’s world budget have dramatically shifted away from new construction to renovation, repair, maintenance, and sustainability of built structures.   We all are also aware of the ad-hoc procedures and rampant associated waste associated with the billions of dollars being spent annually.

Until we education ourselves and our community on the importance of early and ongoing collaboration, LEAN construction delivery methods, mutual respect/trust, team-based decision making, long term relationships, best value procurement, life-cycle costs versus first-cost, owner leadership without excessive management and control, continuous improvement, and key performance indicators….    the shift toward positive outcomes will simply not occur.

Job Order Contracting - LEAN Construction Delivery

2015 optimized facility renovation and repair

standardized cost data

Best Value Construction

job order contacting strategy

job order contracting value-based

job order contracting

job order contracting

People Model

IPD and JOC are core components of BIM

The Owner  our client and life-cycle facility management should be the focus of everyone’s efforts from day one.

Integrated Project Delivery  IPD, as noted in the video, is not a new process, nor is Job Order Contracting (IPD for facility renovation, repair and minor new construction). http://youtu.be/4dqW70eoQH4
 Both are very important components of a BIM strategy and to a process centric approach to construction that improves productivity and quality.

The current way of doing business within our AEC community is BROKEN.  http://youtu.be/tfb5nK97DdQ  We need better buildings, better pricing, better value!

The effort curve is important to both IPD and JOC, and improving construction productivity. http://youtu.be/9bUlBYc_Gl4
We must decide if decisions are going to be made by judges and lawyers, vs. Owners, Architects, and Contractors.

Buildings are assembled not built. This matters as PROCESSES for assembly are often “ad hoc”, and ill-defined. http://youtu.be/UnXG2q8tbyY

BIM is facility life-cycle management!  BIM, BAM, BOOM! … silly? http://youtu.be/5IgdcCemevI  Yes.   On target? You bet!   The value of BIM is the process leading to lower facility life-cycle costs and improved conditions, operations, and utilization management.

Where to start?  BIMF!

BIM Framework

via http://www.4clicks.com – premier software for efficient project delivery- IPD, JOC, SABER, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA … visual estimating and project management.

BIM for FM – Life-cycle Facility Management

Building information modeling (BIM) is a disruptive new technology in the construction industry and altering way structures are managed from concept thru deconstruction.  The processes in which Owners, Contractors, Architects, Engineers, Engineers, Overight Groups, Users Business Product Manufacturers, manage the built environment will dramatically change.

Collaboration, communication, and transparency will drive improved productivity and decision support.  Utilization, sustainability, security and life-safety, as well as long term economics will all be improved.

BIM models, communicating with multiple other knowledge domains, such as CPMS, CMMS, CAFM, BAS, GIS, and efficient contruction delivery methods such as JOC – Job Order Contracting, and IPD – Integrated Project Delivery will enable the improved, standardized information usage.

Life-cycle management supported by digital technology and robust, domain specfic, supportive knowledge area is the hallmark of BIM.

Life-cycle BIM - Bulding Information Modeling Framework


Collaboration Levels - Contruction Delivery Methods are Integral to BIM

BIM and the Role of Neural Networks – AI

(via www.4clicks.com – leading provider of software and services for efficient construction delivery including cost estimating, project-document-contract management, visual estimating/QTO, exclusive 400,000 enhancement of RSMeans cost data … for JOC, IPD, SABER, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, IDIQ, POCA, BOA … )

There is definately a role for the application of neural networks / AI within the AEC sector.

The technology would  help to support the integrage of disparate data.

That said, it is the lack of awarencess of, and associated implementation of existent robust business processes that is primary issue within our industry.
For example, many FMers don’t appreciate the differences of CMMS, CPMS, CAFM… or the criticality of standardized reference cost data, UNIFORMAT, MASTERFORMAT, core benchmarks….FCIs, etc., or COBIE, OMNICLASS, etc.  No do many appreciate the role of efficient construction delivery methods such as IPD (integrated project devliery) and JOC (job order contracting), the later a form of IPD specifically for facility renovation, repair, sustainability, and minor new construction.

Neural networks can parse disparate data (to a degree, they are   about 80% to 99%+ accuarate depending upon source data and specific application, and thus still require human intervention such as manual mapping of “outliers”), FMers would do well to focus upon process, efficient construction delivery methods, etc.

(Source for following paragraph and above image –http://blog.aecsa.org )

 Neural networks have been used in computer science for speech recognition, image analysis, adaptive controls, software agents, and statistical analysis for some time now. Your input layer [see image above] would consist of multiple models and code standards databases from different sources and phases of a project. This inputs are facets of an aggregate building model, interpreted by a middle layer (algorithms aka secret sauce) which results in the desired output (BIM) for specialized purposes (i.e. design, engineering, FM). They are in no way practical as the software architecture for a BIM authoring application as they are slower and require more computing resources to retrieve data. However, they would be useful for interpreting the relationships between nodes in an aggregate data structure where compute resources and storage space are not an issue… enter cloud computing.

The Criticality of Project Delivery to Sustainability

Change on the AEC Horizon?

 The ability to meet sustainability and carbon footprint goals in the non-residential buildings sector will require the implementation of robust business processes, the integration of core industry knowledge domains, and the deployment of supporting technologies.

Major productivity gains within the Architectural, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) sector can be achieved by the complementary processes and technologies of 4D/5D Building Information Modeling (BIM), Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), and Job Order Contracting (JOC), which provide the requisite framework for building trust, collaboration, and increased productivity – from project conceptualization thru construction and subsequent operations/maintenance.

 While the success of these process and technology tools is dependent upon fundamental changes in the AEC sector, the critical  issues of global warming, diminishing natural resources, and the dynamics of an altered world economy will help to speed adoption.

via www.4clicks.com, leading cost estimating and construction delivery management software provider for JOC, SABER, IPD, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POC, IDIQ, BOA ….